Texas to Canada, 1200 miles on US 75

The Talimena Scenic Byway crosses from Arkansas into Oklahoma on east to west mountain ridges.

"Travel a short drive to the Talimena National Scenic Byway. Explore the golden valleys of a majestic byway and discover historic towns along the way. The Talimena Scenic Drive offers you more than 50 miles of the most breathtaking vistas ..."  http://www.talimenascenicdrive.com/

Do take the time to ride 89 miles east of our route in Calvin, OK and enjoy the Talimena Scenic Byway. from US 271 in Oklahoma to US 71 in Mena, Arkansas. It's similar to the Blue Ridge Parkway, with no trucks allowed and many views. 

See Google map with directions.


Dallas to Omaha - 653 miles

Dallas to Omaha - 653 miles on US Highway 75 passes the Little House on the Prairie Museum

"The Kansas prairie, with it’s open skies, seemingly endless horizon, and tall grasses waving in the wind attracted homesteaders from all over the world. 

 

When Charles P. Ingalls, his wife, Caroline Lake Quiner Ingalls, and their daughters, Mary and Laura camped on the Kansas prairie in 1869 they had no way of knowing that it would change their lives and children’s literature forever.

 

The cabin that now sits on the Little House on the Prairie Museum site was reconstructed according to Laura Ingalls' own descriptions by Brigadier General William A. Kurtis and his wife, Wilma Horton Kurtis, with the help of volunteers from the local chapter of the Jaycees from Independence in 1977."

http://www.littlehouseontheprairiemuseum.com/menu/


Omaha, Nebraska to the Canadian border - 586 miles

Omaha to the Canadian Border on US 75
Omaha to the Canadian Border on US 75

 

Fort Atkinson State Historical Park

"Fort Atkinson was the first United States Army post to be established west of the Missouri River in the unorganized region of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. Located just east of present-day Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, the fort was erected in 1819 and abandoned in 1827. The site is now known as Fort Atkinson State Historical Park and is a National Historic Landmark. A replica fort was constructed by the state at the site during the 1980s–1990s.

 

The post, which included soldiers, traders, trappers, and other frontier people, has been credited by the Nebraska State Legislature as the first town in Nebraska. Founded almost 30 years before the creation of the Nebraska Territory, Fort Atkinson had more than 1,000 residents. It included a brickyard, lime kiln, stone quarry, grist mill, saw mill, and cooper shop."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Atkinson_%28Nebraska%29

 

Fort Atkinson, Fort Calhoun Nebraska - Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=522081
Fort Atkinson, Fort Calhoun Nebraska - Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=522081

Why Carter Lake, Iowa is located in East Omaha

Due to an 1877 shift in the Missouri River, Carter Lake, Iowa is surrounded by Nebraska
Due to an 1877 shift in the Missouri River, Carter Lake, Iowa is surrounded by Nebraska

 

"As it so often did in the 1800s, the Missouri River changed its course during an ice jam in 1877 that dug a new river channel near Saratoga Bend. When the waters shifted, a crescent-shaped body of water called Cut-Off Lake was all that remained of the river’s previous channel. Alongside the lake, which still had the Missouri River lapping into it from the east, was a small slice of land owned by Council Bluffs resident Thomas Jefferis that had been on the Iowa side of the river before the flood. ...

 

One of the plants was the Carter White Lead Works – which later evolved into Dutch Boy Paint – owned by a man named Levi Carter. The lake and the town itself assumed the name Carter Lake in 1909 after his widow donated much of their land along the shoreline to the city of Omaha. ...

 

Council Bluffs officials, however, saw Omaha’s intrusion as a brazen attempt to snatch land that rightfully belonged on their tax rolls. The ensuing legal battle over whether Iowa or Nebraska had jurisdiction over Cut-Off Island went to the Supreme Court. In its 1892 ruling, the court sided with Iowa on the basis that state lines remain the same when a river avulsed, or dramatically altered, its path in 1877. Therefore, the land had never left Iowa, despite its position on the Nebraska side of the river."

 

from the 2012 article by John Schreier,  jschreier@nonpareilonline.com

http://www.nonpareilonline.com/news/carter-lake-s-colorful-confusing-history/article_45d603ec-338f-5a45-9bb9-1843542ae556.html

 

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