Palo Duro Canyon, Texas Panhandle

Deer poses for a photo. Palo Duro State Park, Texas.  Google maps photo by Sergio Rebolledo.
Deer poses for a photo. Palo Duro State Park, Texas. Google maps photo by Sergio Rebolledo.

 

"As the second-largest canyon in the United States, it is roughly 70 mi long and has an average width of 6 mi, but reaches a width of 20 mi at places. Its depth is around 820 ft, but in some locations, it can increase up to 1,000 ft. Palo Duro Canyon has been named "The Grand Canyon of Texas" both for its size and for its dramatic geological features, including the multicolored layers of rock and steep mesa walls similar to those in the Grand Canyon."

 

 

Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Amarillo, TX.  Wikipedia photo by Leaflet - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7743612
Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Amarillo, TX. Wikipedia photo by Leaflet - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7743612

 

Looking to go camping?  "Choose from campsites with water and electricity, primitive drive-up sites, equestrian sites, or backpack camping areas. Stay in one of three cabins on the canyon’s rim or four limited service cabins on the canyon floor. Rent our new pavilion for a wedding, reunion or meeting."

 

 

Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Amarillo, TX. Google maps photo by Bobby McCracken.
Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Amarillo, TX. Google maps photo by Bobby McCracken.

Caprock Canyon

Caprock Canyon formation near Amarillo, TX. Google maps photo by Jeff Lynch.
Caprock Canyon formation near Amarillo, TX. Google maps photo by Jeff Lynch.
Bison herd at Caprock Canyons State Park near Amarillo, Texas.
Bison herd at Caprock Canyons State Park near Amarillo, Texas.

Caprock Canyons State Park has more formations, 2 hours southeast of Palo Duro. Plus you can check out their Bison herd. "History was made on Aug. 19, 2014 at Caprock Canyons State Park as cow #120 took the first steps to lead the Texas State Bison Herd into their new range within the park. The herd now has over 10,000 acres to roam. This legendary bison herd was started by famed cattleman Charles Goodnight and his wife Mary Ann in 1878. It is one of the five foundation herds credited with saving this magnificent animal from extinction." 

 

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