A geyser near Asheville NC

Andrews Geyser photo by Dwalter5, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10337823
Andrews Geyser photo by Dwalter5, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10337823

When in operation, Andrews Geyser shoots water continuously to a height of about 80 feet. Its water supply is drawn from a pond located at the current site of the Inn on Mill Creek, a local Bed & Breakfast. The Inn's property contains the original dam constructed by the railroad in the late 19th century, and the pond formed by the dam with the water of the Long Branch of Mill Creek. A 6-inch-diameter (150 mm) cast iron pipe runs from the dam, through a hidden gate valve, then underground approximately two miles downhill to the fountain. The water comes out a half-inch nozzle pointed skyward, and the 500 feet of elevation difference creates the pressure that drives the fountain. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrews_Geyser


80 mile loop northeast of Asheville, NC. Click the map to enlarge it.
80 mile loop northeast of Asheville, NC. Click the map to enlarge it.

Mount Mitchell sign photo by Jbarta - Own work, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16453748
Mount Mitchell sign photo by Jbarta - Own work, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16453748

Mount Mitchell - "The mountain, previously known as Black Dome for its rounded shape, was named after Elisha Mitchell, a professor at the University of North Carolina, who first explored the Black Mountain region in 1835, and determined that the height of the range exceeded by several hundred feet that of Mount Washington in New Hampshire, commonly thought at the time to be the highest point east of the Rocky Mountains."  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Mitchell

View of Mt Mitchell from the Blue Ridge Parkway overlook.
View of Mt Mitchell from the Blue Ridge Parkway overlook.

"Craggy Gardens, just north of Asheville, North Carolina, is one of the most dramatic viewpoints on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Stunning vistas of the Blue Ridge Mountains stretch far into Tennessee to the west and toward central North Carolina to the east. These views can be enjoyed from the parking area near the Craggy Gardens Visitor Center and along nearby hiking trails. ...

In early summer, Craggy Gardens becomes a mountain-sized bouquet when the rhododendron thickets on the upper heights cover the landscape in pink and purple. A favorite hiking trail, Craggy Pinnacle, leads hikers through a "tunnel" of rhododendron to the summit which offers 360-degree view. This 1.5 mile round trip is an easy walk."  http://www.blueridgeheritage.com/attractions-destinations/craggy-gardens

"The Great Craggy Mountains are an area of exposed rock surfaces and high peaks that provide breathtaking views of distant southern Appalachian ridges. Large expanses of native rhododendron cover the slopes and summits of the Craggies. The area has long been known as Craggy Gardens. Throughout the summer, smaller native wildflowers cover the ground with vibrant splashes of color. ... Our favorite hike here is the Craggy Pinnacle Trail. It's a 1.5-mile roundtrip hike to the top for exceptional panoramic views (pic above) that are hard to top in Western North Carolina."  https://www.romanticasheville.com/Craggy.htm

 


The Folk Art Center is home to the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The center showcases the finest in traditional and contemporary crafts of the Southern Appalachians. In addition to an Eastern National bookstore and Blue Ridge Parkway information desk, the center houses three galleries, a library and the Guild’s oldest craft shop. Beginning in March each year, visitors can see live craft demonstrations daily in the Folk Art Center lobby. The Folk Art Center is located in east Asheville on the Blue Ridge Parkway, a five-minute drive from downtown.  http://www.southernhighlandguild.org/folk-art-center/