Your dream ride on Route 66



Whether you're planning a ride or just sightseeing, we've gathered lots of Route 66 info here, so click on the links below and enjoy. 

Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor
Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor

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 Motorcycle Tours

Eagle Rider offers a 15 day, 14 night self-driving tour.  "EagleRider’s Route 66 Self Drive Motorcycle Tour is a 15 day journey riding along the world famous “Mother Road” highway. You begin your tour in Chicago, IL and ride for 2400 exciting miles to Los Angeles, CA. Along the way you will pass through 8 states: Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California, making stops in some of the most beautiful and historic American cities. You will get a definite sense of the 1950’s Midwest as you ride your Harley into the Ozark Mountains, along the Old West’s Indian country in Oklahoma, across the Great Plains, through the 400 year old city Santa Fe, NM, and into Nevada gambling Mecca, Laughlin. By the time you make it back to Los Angeles you will have toured the best of the “Mainstream of America”, Route 66."  More info.


www.ridingroute66.us  Another Route 66 one-way motorcycle rental. Begin in Chicago or LA. Harley's and BMW's available for rent. Here's their photo gallery. There are lots more photos on their facebook page


www.thelostadventure.com has a number of tours including a Route 66 tour. They also have a Top 10 Tips page.


Route66motorcycletour.com  Route 66 fly in and ride two week tour, including two nights at the Grand Canyon - view the canyon by sunset, sunrise, or from a helicopter.  "Route 66, the earliest automotive transportation link between Chicago and Los Angeles, came into official existence in 1926.This U.S. national highway was designed to connect the main streets of rural and urban communities as part of a major national thoroughfare. As a result, Route 66 was a lifeline through much of America, connecting the small Midwestern towns in the states of Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas, with the big cities of Los Angeles and Chicago. Known as the "Main Street of America," Route 66 was also dubbed the "Mother Road" by author John Steinbeck in his novel, "The Grapes of Wrath." For those that travelled Route 66 during the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, it was the path to the promised land of the West. After World War II, many former soldiers headed west on the Mother Road to seek their fortunes. All these travellers represented a business opportunity for American entrepreneurs who quickly sought to fill customers' needs with eye-catching motels, gas stations, restaurants, entertainment attractions, and the like. It is these glitzy commercial establishments that gave the highway a special character and it is this character that invites motorcyclists to "get your kicks on Route 66."

"Included in this tour of Route 66 is a small detour to one of nature's greatest sights, the Grand Canyon. There will be two nights here, giving ample time to view the canyon by sunset, sunrise, or from a helicopter, if desired."


Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor
Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor

The Roadhouse66.com 2012 tour was cancelled, but scroll down the page for a photo slideshow with 56 photos.

 


Information


Route 66 history, overall map, state by state info and photos, and forum.  The Travel Channel also has a nice article. "Completed in 1926, Route 66 winds 2,448 miles from Chicago to L.A. Through most of the Western states, Route 66 follows Interstate 40, which eventually replaced much of the Mother Road. In some areas, the remnants of 66 parallel the interstate as a frontage road. In others, the old road still goes directly through town." http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/road-trips/articles/route-66

Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor
Arizona's Grand Canyon - Photo by Tony Taylor

Adventure Touring is here!


Snowcapped peak - photo by Tony Taylor
Snowcapped peak - photo by Tony Taylor